Sexual Assault or Domestic/Dating Violence

What is Sexual Assault?

Report Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is any form of sexual activity where consent is not consciously and voluntarily given. It includes anything from touching to penetration. Anyone can be a victim of sexual assault.

Consent is a clear, knowing, and voluntary decision to engage in sexual activity. Because consent is voluntary, it is given without coercion, force, threats, or intimidation. Silence, in and of itself, cannot be interpreted as consent. Failure by the victim to offer physical resistance to the offender does not mean consent was given. Consent can be given by words or actions, as long as those words or actions consist of an affirmative, unambigious, conscious decision by each participant to engage in a mutually agreed-upon sexual activity.

Consent cannot be given when a person is incapacitated. Where alcohol or drugs are involved, incapacitation is determined by how the alcohol or drugs have impacted a person’s decision- making capacity, awareness of consequences, and/or ability to make fully informed judgments. iSexual assault is a traumatic event, and victims commonly experience fear, shock, confusion, disbelief, embarrassment, shame, guilt and many other emotions.

What Should I Do if I’ve Been Sexually Assaulted?

If you are in immediate danger or need immediate assistance, call 911.

If you have any serious injuries, please go to Washington Regional Medical Center’s Emergency Department 479-463-1700.

Talk to someone you trust.

As soon as you are in a safe place, tell someone you can trust about what happened—a roommate, friend, resident adviser, minister or counselor—someone who can provide emotional support and objectively help you make a plan. 

STAR Central Office of the Pat Walker Health Center
479-575-7252
M-F,  8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

Hotlines (24 hours, 7 days a week):

Try to preserve all physical evidence.

If you have been sexually assaulted, potential evidence of the assault may found on your clothes, hair, body or other surfaces (e.g., bedsheets, rug, etc.). If possible, try to avoid:

  • bathing, showering or douching;
  • using the bathroom;
  • changing clothes;
  • combing hair;
  • washing your face or hands;
  • eating or drinking;
  • brushing your teeth;
  • cleaning up where it happened;
  • washing clothes, bedding, rugs or anything else in the area of the assault; or
  • moving anything that the offender may have touched.

If it’s not possible to do all of the above, don’t be discouraged from having a forensic exam. In the state of Arkansas, you have up to 72 hours after the assault for forensic evidence collection.

If you have changed clothes, place the clothes you were wearing during the assault - including underwear - in a paper (not plastic) bag.

Preservation of potential evidence does not mean that you have to pursue criminal charges, but it keeps that option open for you.

Get Medical Attention

If you have any serious injuries, please go to Washington Regional Medical Center’s Emergency Department or call 479-463-1700

Many assaults do not result in serious physical injury. You can seek medical care at any time following an assault, but please be advised that in the state of Arkansas, forensic evidence exam and collection (a.k.a. “rape kit”) can only be done within 72 hours from the time of the incident. Having a forensic examination performed within 72 hours helps preserve potential evidence.

In addition, medical professionals can evaluate your risk of sexually transmitted diseases and/or pregnancy. You also have the right to have a victim advocate available during any part of these processes to provide support and assistance with understanding your options.

The following local providers offer specially trained victim advocates, as well as providers for forensic evidence collection (a.k.a. “rape kits”):

STAR Central’s RESPECT (Rape Education Services by Peers Encouraging Conscious Thought) website has more information about how to seek medical care and what steps you can take.

How to Report

To report to law enforcement:

  • If the assault occurred on campus: Report to UAPD: 479-575-2222
  • If the assault occurred off campus within Fayetteville: Report to the Fayetteville Police Department: 479-587-3555
  • If the assault occurred outside of Fayetteville: Report to the local law enforcement of that area. If you’re not sure who this is, UAPD will be happy to assist you in contacting the appropriate police department.

To report to the university:

The U of A is committed to providing an environment for employees, students and campus visitors that is free from harassment or violence. Any student, faculty or staff member, applicant or visitor who has been the victim of sexual assault, sexual violence, sexual misconduct or domestic violence is encouraged to report it to our Title IX Coordinator: 479-575-7111 or titleix@uark.edu.

You can also Submit a Title IX Complaint online.

Either or both reporting options may be exercised. A STAR Central victim advocate can help provide confidential personal support throughout the reporting, investigating, and adjudicating/prosecuting processes.

The U of A strongly supports reporting any incident of sexual misconduct, including sexual assault. The chances that the University and law enforcement officials will be able to effectively address an incident are increased by prompt reporting. The University, however, recognizes that reporting sexual assault or domestic violence is a deeply personal choice that only you can make. And although it might not be possible to collect useful forensic evidence more than 72 hours after the incident, the incident may be reported at any time.

The University wants to help you regardless of whether you make a report. Victim advocacy services, mental health services, and medical services are all available to you regardless if an official Title IX or police report is made. For more info, call STAR Central Office of the Pat Walker Health Center at 479-575-7252. For more resources, please visit the Title IX website

Get ongoing support and aftercare

Personal care is important for anyone who has experienced sexual violence. Trauma affects people in different ways. It may be difficult to engage in daily activities, including attendance at class, eating, sleeping, general hygiene and other daily activities of living. There are resources available so you don’t have to find your path toward healing on your own.

Advocacy services for victims and survivors of sexual assault or relationship violence are available at the STAR (Support, Training, Advocacy, and Resources) Central Office: survivor@uark.edu 479-575-7252. All contacts and survivor services are confidential. More resources can be found on the Personal Care After Rape page.

What is Domestic or Dating Violence?

Report Domestic/Dating Violence

Domestic and/or dating violence includes violence against a spouse, former spouse, partner or someone who has had a dating, romantic or intimate relationship. Violence includes assault, battery and anything that puts the victim in fear of bodily injury or death. Anyone can be a victim of domestic or dating violence.

Both sexual assault and domestic violence are extreme forms of sexual harassment and are prohibited by Title IX.

What Should I Do if I’ve Been the Victim of Domestic Violence?

Get to a safe place

If you are in immediate danger, call 911.

If your abuser is someone you live with, get to a shelter or safe place as soon as possible.

Fayetteville's Peace at Home provides emergency shelter for women in danger from domestic abusers. They also offer support and advocacy for victims to help them with leaving their abusers and navigating their legal options.

Hotline:
Peace at Home Shelter: 877-442-9811

You can seek medical care at any time following an assault, but we strongly recommend that you do so as soon as possible. Having a medical examination performed is critical in preserving potential evidence, documenting the assault and helping law enforcement and/or the university to respond effectively.

You can get medical attention at the following places:

  • Pat Walker Health Center (M-F, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.) 479-575-4451
  • Washington Regional Medical Center (24/7): 479-713-1000

Make a Plan for Your Safety

You have options to ensure your safety. For example, if your abuser doesn’t live with you, you can take out a restraining order to keep him or her away from you. The UAPD can assist you with this: 479-575-2222.

If your abuser does live with you, you will need to think about what is the best course of action for you. Advocates with the Peace at Home Shelter can assist you in determining the best way for you to get away from your abuser and stay safe: 877-442-9811

How to Report

To report to law enforcement:

  • If the assault occurred on campus: Report to UAPD: 479-575-2222
  • If the assault occurred off campus within Fayetteville: Report to the Fayetteville Police Department: 479-587-3555
  • If the assault occurred outside of Fayetteville: Report to the local law enforcement of that area. If you’re not sure who this is, UAPD will be happy to assist you in contacting the appropriate police department.

To report to the university:

The U of A is committed to providing an environment for employees, students and campus visitors that is free from harassment or violence. Any student, faculty or staff member, applicant or visitor who has been the victim of sexual assault, sexual violence, sexual misconduct or domestic violence is encouraged to report it to our Title IX Coordinator: 479-575-7111 or titleix@uark.edu. 

You can also Submit a Title IX Complaint online. 

Either or both reporting options may be exercised. A STAR Central victim advocate can help provide confidential personal support throughout the reporting, investigating, and adjudicating/prosecuting processes.

The U of A strongly supports reporting any incident of sexual misconduct, including sexual assault. The chances that the University and law enforcement officials will be able to effectively address an incident are increased by prompt reporting. The University, however, recognizes that reporting sexual assault or domestic violence is a deeply personal choice that only you can make. And although it might not be possible to collect useful forensic evidence more than 72 hours after the incident, the incident may be reported at any time.

The University wants to help you regardless of whether you make a report. Victim advocacy services, mental health services, and medical services are all available to you regardless if an official Title IX or police report is made. For more info, call STAR Central Office of the Pat Walker Health Center at 479-575-7252. For more resources, please visit the Title IX website

Get ongoing support and aftercare

Personal care is important for anyone who has experienced domestic or dating violence. Trauma affects people in different ways. It may be difficult to engage in daily activities, including attendance at class, eating, sleeping, general hygiene and other daily activities of living. There are resources available so you don’t have to find your path toward healing on your own.


For more information visit the Responsible Employee Reporting page.